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William Butler Yeats Poetry

William Butler Yeats (/ˈjeɪts/; 13 June 1865 – 28 January 1939) was an Irish poet and one of the foremost figures of 20th-century literature. A pillar of both the Irish and British literary establishments, he helped to found the Abbey Theatre, and in his later years served as an Irish Senator fo... Read More

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I have pointed out the yelling pack,
The hare leap to the wood,
And when I pass a compliment
Rejo

We should be hidden from their eyes,
Being but holy shows
And bodies broken like a thorn
Whereon

SICKNESS brought me this
Thought, in that scale of his:
Why should I be dismayed
Though flame had

THE moments passed as at a play;
I had the wisdom love brings forth;
I had my share of mother-wit,

O bid me mount and sail up there
Amid the cloudy wrack,
For peg and Meg and Paris' love
That had

Male Fairies: Do not fear us, earthly maid!
We will lead you hand in hand
By the willows in the gl

I DREAMED that one had died in a strange place
Near no accustomed hand,
And they had nailed the bo

TURNING and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; t

WINE comes in at the mouth
And love comes in at the eye;
That's all we shall know for truth
Befor

Endure what life God gives and ask no longer span;
Cease to remember the delights of youth, travel-

i{Sung by the people of Faery over Diarmuid and Grania,}
i{in their bridal sleep under a Cromlech.}

I MADE my song a coat
Covered with embroideries
Out of old mythologies
From heel to throat;
But

i{My Soul} I summon to the winding ancient stair;
Set all your mind upon the steep ascent,
Upon th

HAD I the heavens' embroidered cloths,
Enwrought with golden and silver light,
The blue and the di

TURNING and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; t

I admit the briar
Entangled in my hair
Did not injure me;
My blenching and trembling,
Nothing bu

The deck of an ancient ship. At the right of the stage is the mast, with a large square sail hiding

I have old women's secrets now
That had those of the young;
Madge tells me what I dared not think

OTHERS because you did not keep
That deep-sworn vow have been friends of mine;
Yet always when I l

We sat under an old thorn-tree
And talked away the night,
Told all that had been said or done
Sin

Like the moon her kindness is,
If kindness I may call
What has no comprehension in't,
But is the

A crazy man that found a cup,
When all but dead of thirst,
Hardly dared to wet his mouth
Imaginin

THE angels are stooping
Above your bed;
They weary of trooping
With the whimpering dead.
God's l

ON thrones from China to Peru
All sorts of kings have sat
That men and women of all sorts
proclai

A mermaid found a swimming lad,
Picked him for her own,
Pressed her body to his body,
Laughed; an

I WILL arise and go now, and go to Innisfree,
And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles ma

COME swish around, my pretty punk,
And keep me dancing still
That I may stay a sober man
Although

Though nurtured like the sailing moon
In beauty's murderous brood,
She walked awhile and blushed a

Laughter not time destroyed my voice
And put that crack in it,
And when the moon's pot-bellied
I

I
First Love

THOUGH nurtured like the sailing moon
In beauty's murderous brood,
She walked awh

WHEN you are old and grey and full of sleep,
And nodding by the fire, take down this book,
And slo

William Butler Yeats Poetry

William Butler Yeats (/ˈjeɪts/; 13 June 1865 – 28 January 1939) was an Irish poet and one of the foremost figures of 20th-century literature. A pillar of both the Irish and British literary establishments, he helped to found the Abbey Theatre, and in his later years served as an Irish Senator for two terms, and was a driving force behind the Irish Literary Revival along with Lady Gregory, Edward Martyn and others. He was born in Sandymount, Ireland and educated there and in London. He spent childhood holidays in County Sligo and studied poetry from an early age when he became fascinated by Irish legends and the occult. These topics feature in the first phase of his work, which lasted roughly until the turn of the 20th century. His earliest volume of verse was published in 1889, and its slow-paced and lyrical poems display Yeats's debts to Edmund Spenser, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and the poets of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. From 1900, his poetry grew more physical and realistic. He largely renounced the transcendental beliefs of his youth, though he remained preoccupied with physical and spiritual masks, as well as with cyclical theories of life. In 1923, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.... Read More