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Wallace Stevens Poetry

Wallace Stevens (October 2, 1879 – August 2, 1955) was an American Modernist poet. He was born in Reading, Pennsylvania, educated at Harvard and then New York Law School, and he spent most of his life working as an executive for an insurance company in Hartford, Connecticut. He won the Pulitzer Pr... Read More

Latest Urdu Poetry

My titillations have no foot-notes
And their memorials are the phrases
Of idiosyncratic music.

Complacencies of the peignoir, and late
Coffee and oranges in a sunny chair,
And the green freedom

I
Go on, high ship, since now, upon the shore,
The snake has left its skin upon the floor.
Key

You dweller in the dark cabin,
To whom the watermelon is always purple,
Whose garden is wind and

Weight him down, O side-stars, with the great weightings of
the end.
Seal him there. He looked in

Pour the unhappiness out
From your too bitter heart,
Which grieving will not sweeten.

Poison gr

I
To sing jubilas at exact, accustomed times,
To be crested and wear the mane of a multitude
An

The houses are haunted
By white night-gowns.
None are green,
Or purple with green rings,
Or gree

A sunny day's complete Poussiniana
Divide it from itself. It is this or that
And it is not.
By me

In Hydaspia, by Howzen
Lived a lady, Lady Lowzen,
For whom what is was other things.

Flora she

The poem of the mind in the act of finding
What will suffice. It has not always had
To find: the s

I

Among twenty snowy mountains,
The only moving thing
Was the eye of the black bird.

II

Although you sit in a room that is gray,
Except for the silver
Of the straw-paper,
And pick

At night, by the fire,
The colors of the bushes
And of the fallen leaves,
Repeating themselves,

One must have a mind of winter
To regard the frost and the boughs
Of the pine-trees crusted with s

He is not here, the old sun,
As absent as if we were asleep.

The field is frozen. The leaves are

As the immense dew of Florida
Brings forth
The big-finned palm
And green vine angering for life,

The old brown hen and the old blue sky,
Between the two we live and die--
The broken cartwheel on

Poetry is the supreme fiction, madame.
Take the moral law and make a nave of it
And from the nave

One chemical afternoon in mid-autumn,
When the grand mechanics of earth and sky were near;
Even

“Mother of heaven, regina of the clouds,
O sceptre of the sun, crown of the moon,
There is not

Twenty men crossing a bridge,
Into a village,
Are twenty men crossing twenty bridges,
Into twenty

Light the first light of evening, as in a room
In which we rest and, for small reason, think
The w

I placed a jar in Tennessee,
And round it was, upon a hill.
It made the slovenly wilderness
Surro

That's what misery is,
Nothing to have at heart.
It is to have or nothing.
It is a thing to have,

The lilacs wither in the Carolinas.
Already the butterflies flutter above the cabins.
Already the

Call the roller of big cigars,
The muscular one, and bid him whip
In kitchen cups concupiscent cur

I

Just as my fingers on these keys
Make music, so the self-same sounds
On my spirit make a m

Among the more irritating minor ideas
Of Mr. Homburg during his visits home
To Concord, at the e

A tempest cracked on the theatre. Quickly,
The wind beat in the roof and half the walls.
The ruin

It is true that the rivers went nosing like swine,
Tugging at banks, until they seemed
Bland belly

In that November off Tehuantepec,
The slopping of the sea grew still one night
And in the morning

The difficulty to think at the end of day,
When the shapeless shadow covers the sun
And nothing

I.
There’s a little square in Paris,
Waiting until we pass.
They sit idly there,
They sip

At the earliest ending of winter,
In March, a scrawny cry from outside
Seemed like a sound in his

Chieftain Iffucan of Azcan in caftan
Of tan with henna hackles, halt!

Damned universal cock, as

Wallace Stevens Poetry

Wallace Stevens (October 2, 1879 – August 2, 1955) was an American Modernist poet. He was born in Reading, Pennsylvania, educated at Harvard and then New York Law School, and he spent most of his life working as an executive for an insurance company in Hartford, Connecticut. He won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry for his Collected Poems in 1955. Some of his best-known poems include "Anecdote of the Jar", "Disillusionment of Ten O'Clock", "The Emperor of Ice-Cream", "The Idea of Order at Key West", "Sunday Morning", "The Snow Man", and "Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird". The son of a prosperous lawyer, Stevens attended Harvard as a non-degree special student, after which he moved to New York City and briefly worked as a journalist. He then attended New York Law School, graduating in 1903. On a trip back to Reading in 1904 Stevens met Elsie Viola Kachel (1886–1963, also known as Elsie Moll), a young woman who had worked as a saleswoman, milliner, and stenographer. After a long courtship, he married her in 1909 over the objections of his parents, who considered her lower-class. As The New York Times reported in an article in 2009, "Nobody from his family attended the wedding, and Stevens never again visited or spoke to his parents during his father’s lifetime." A daughter, Holly, was born in 1924. She later edited her father's letters and a collection of his poems. In 1913, the Stevenses rented a New York City apartment from sculptor Adolph A. Weinman, who made a bust of Elsie. Her striking profile was later used on Weinman's 1916–1945 Mercury dime design and possibly for the head of the Walking Liberty Half Dollar. In later years Elsie Stevens began to exhibit symptoms of mental illness and the marriage suffered as a result, but the Stevenses remained married.... Read More