Paul Laurence Dunbar Poetry

Paul Laurence Dunbar (June 27, 1872 – February 9, 1906) was an American poet, novelist, and playwright of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Born in Dayton, Ohio, to parents who had been enslaved in Kentucky before the American Civil War, Dunbar began to write stories and verse when still a c... Read More

Latest Urdu Poetry

If I could but forget
The fullness of those first sweet days,
When you burst sun-like thro' the

I Found you and I lost you,
All on a gleaming day.
The day was filled with sunshine,
And the l

SWING yo' lady roun' an' roun',
Do de bes' you know;
Mek yo' bow an' p'omenade
Up an' down de flo

Win' a-blowin' gentle so de san' lay low,
San' a little heavy f'om de rain,
All de pa'ms a-wavin'

Tis fine to play
In the fragrant hay,
And romp on the golden load;
To ride old Jack
To the barn

De axes has been ringin' in de woods de blessid day,
An' de chips has been a-fallin' fa' an' thick;

Lay me down beneaf de willers in de grass,
Whah de branch 'll go a-singin' as it pass.
An' w'en I'

DE win' is blowin' wahmah,
An hit's blowin' f'om de bay;
Dey's a so't o' mist a-risin'
All erlong

I know a little country place
Where still my heart doth linger,
And o'er its fields is every grace

The mist has left the greening plain,
The dew-drops shine like fairy rain,
The coquette rose awa

They please me not-- these solemn songs
That hint of sermons covered up.
'T is true the world sh

I know a little country place
Where still my heart doth linger,
And o'er its fields is every grace

Come, essay a sprightly measure,
Tuned to some light song of pleasure.
Maidens, let your brows be

Yes, my ha't's ez ha'd ez stone—
Go 'way, Sam, an' lemme 'lone.
No; I ain't gwine change my mi

I know what the caged bird feels, alas!
When the sun is bright on the upland slopes;
When the wi

Wen de snow 's a-fallin'
An' de win' is col'.
Mammy 'mence a-callin',
Den she 'mence to scol',
'

We wear the mask that grins and lies,
It hides our cheeks and shades our eyes,--
This debt we pay

OH, I haven't got long to live, for we all
Die soon, e'en those who live longest;
And the poorest

The Oriole sings in the greening grove
As if he were half-way waiting,
The rosebuds peep from th

OH, dere's lots o' keer an' trouble
In dis world to swaller down;
An' ol' Sorrer's purty lively
I

THE YOUNG MASTER ASKS FOR A STORY

Whut you say, dah? huh, uh! chile,
You 's enough to dribe me w

UNCLE JOHN, he makes me tired;
Thinks 'at he's jest so all-fired
Smart, 'at he kin pick up, so,
E

THE air is dark, the sky is gray,
The misty shadows come and go,
And here within my dusky room
Ea

'Break me my bounds, and let me fly
To regions vast of boundless sky;
Nor I, like piteous Daphne,

ON the wide veranda white,
In the purple failing light,
Sits the master while the sun is lowly bur

It may be misery not to sing at all,
And to go silent through the brimming day;
It may be misery

Paul Laurence Dunbar Poetry

Paul Laurence Dunbar (June 27, 1872 – February 9, 1906) was an American poet, novelist, and playwright of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Born in Dayton, Ohio, to parents who had been enslaved in Kentucky before the American Civil War, Dunbar began to write stories and verse when still a child and was president of his high school's literary society. He published his first poems at the age of 16 in a Dayton newspaper. Much of Dunbar's more popular work in his lifetime was written in the Negro dialect associated with the antebellum South, though he also used the Midwestern regional dialect of James Whitcomb Riley.[1] Dunbar's work was praised by William Dean Howells, a leading editor associated with the Harper's Weekly, and Dunbar was one of the first African-American writers to establish an international reputation. He wrote the lyrics for the musical comedy In Dahomey (1903), the first all-African-American musical produced on Broadway. The musical later also toured in the United States and the United Kingdom. Dunbar also wrote in conventional English in other poetry and novels; since the late 20th century, scholars have become more interested in these other works. Suffering from tuberculosis, Dunbar died at the age of 33.... Read More