Lewis Carroll Poetry

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (/ˈtʃɑːrlz ˈlʌtwɪdʒ ˈdɒdsən/; 27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll (/ˈkærəl/), was an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon, and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice's Adventures in Wond... Read More

Latest Urdu Poetry

'You are old, father William,' the young man said,
'And your hair has become very white;
And yet y

Little Birds are dining
Warily and well,
Hid in mossy cell:
Hid, I say, by waiters
Gorgeous in t

'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,

Matilda Jane, you never look
At any toy or picture-book.
I show you pretty things in vain
You mus

"SISTER, sister, go to bed!
Go and rest your weary head."
Thus the prudent brother said.

"Do

He thought he saw an Elephant
That practised on a fife:
He looked again, and found it was
A lette

The Hunting


The Bellman looked uffish, and wrinkled his brow.
"If only you'd spoken before!

Sent to a friend who had complained that I was glad enough to see
him when he came, but didn't see

The Bellman's Speech

The Bellman himself they all praised to the skies--
Such a carriage, such

Five little girls, of Five, Four, Three, Two, One:
Rolling on the hearthrug, full of tricks and fun

All in the golden afternoon
Full leisurely we glide;
For both our oars, with little skill,
By lit

A BOAT beneath a sunny sky,
Lingering onward dreamily
In an evening of July --
Children three tha

A Mother's breast:
Safe refuge from her childish fears,
From childish troubles, childish tears,

Lady dear, if Fairies may
For a moment lay aside
Cunning tricks and elfish play,
'Tis at happy

BEAUTIFUL Soup, so rich and green,
Waiting in a hot tureen!
Who for such dainties would not stoo

The Beaver's Lesson

They sought it with thimbles, they sought it with care;
They pursued it wi

A boat, beneath a sunny sky
Lingering onward dreamily
In an evening of July --

Children three t

Little maidens, when you look
On this little story-book,
Reading with attentive eye
Its entici

How doth the little crocodile
Improve his shining tail,
And pour the waters of the Nile
On every

Inscribed to a Dear Child:
In Memory of Golden Summer Hours
And Whispers of a Summer Sea


Gir

The Vanishing

They sought it with thimbles, they sought it with care;
They pursued it with fork

I painted her a gushing thing,
With years about a score;
I little thought to find they were
A lea

"Are you deaf, Father William!" the young man said,
"Did you hear what I told you just now?
"Exc

Lady Clara Vere de Vere
Was eight years old, she said:
Every ringlet, lightly shaken, ran itself i

There are certain things - as, a spider, a ghost,
The income-tax, gout, an umbrella for three -
Th

The Landing

"Just the place for a Snark!" the Bellman cried,
As he landed his crew with care;

Blow, blow your trumpets till they crack,
Ye little men of little souls!
And bid them huddle at yo

When midnight mists are creeping,
And all the land is sleeping,
Around me tread the mighty dead,

AY, 'twas here, on this spot,
In that summer of yore,
Atalanta did not
Vote my presence a bore,

Alice was walking beside the White Knight in Looking Glass Land.

'You are sad.' the Knight said i

Lewis Carroll Poetry

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (/ˈtʃɑːrlz ˈlʌtwɪdʒ ˈdɒdsən/; 27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll (/ˈkærəl/), was an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon, and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, which includes the poem "Jabberwocky", and the poem The Hunting of the Snark, all examples of the genre of literary nonsense. He is noted for his facility at word play, logic and fantasy. There are societies in many parts of the world dedicated to the enjoyment and promotion of his works and the investigation of his life. Dodgson's family was predominantly northern English, with Irish connections, conservative and High Church Anglican. Most of Dodgson's male ancestors were army officers or Church of England clergy. His great-grandfather, also named Charles Dodgson, had risen through the ranks of the church to become the Bishop of Elphin. His paternal grandfather, another Charles, had been an army captain, killed in action in Ireland in 1803 when his two sons were hardly more than babies. The older of these sons – yet another Charles Dodgson – was Carroll's father. He went to Westminster School and then to Christ Church, Oxford. He reverted to the other family tradition and took holy orders. He was mathematically gifted and won a double first degree, which could have been the prelude to a brilliant academic career. Instead, he married his first cousin Frances Jane Lutwidge in 1830 and became a country parson. Dodgson was born in the small parsonage at Daresbury in Cheshire near the towns of Warrington and Runcorn, the eldest boy but already the third child of the four-and-a-half-year-old marriage. Eight more children followed. When Charles was 11, his father was given the living of Croft-on-Tees in North Yorkshire, and the whole family moved to the spacious rectory. This remained their home for the next 25 years. Charles's father was an active and highly conservative cleric of the Church of England who later became the Archdeacon of Richmond and involved himself, sometimes influentially, in the intense religious disputes that were dividing the church. He was High Church, inclining to Anglo-Catholicism, an admirer of John Henry Newman and the Tractarian movement, and did his best to instil such views in his children. Young Charles was to develop an ambiguous relationship with his father's values and with the Church of England as a whole. During his early youth, Dodgson was educated at home. His "reading lists" preserved in the family archives testify to a precocious intellect: at the age of seven, he was reading books such as The Pilgrim's Progress. He also suffered from a stammer – a condition shared by most of his siblings – that often influenced his social life throughout his years. At the age of twelve, he was sent to Richmond Grammar School (now part of Richmond School) at nearby Richmond.... Read More