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Kahlil Gibran Poetry

Kahlil Gibran (/dʒɪˈbrɑːn/; sometimes spelled Khalil;[a] full Arabic name Gibran Khalil Gibran, Arabic: جبران خليل جبران‎‎ / ALA-LC: Jubrān Khalīl Jubrān or Jibrān Khalīl Jibrān) (January 6, 1883 – April 10, 1931) was a Lebanese-American artist, poet, and writer of the... Read More

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A mason came forth and said, "Speak to us of Houses."

And he answered and said:

Build of you

Then Almitra spoke, saying, "We would ask now of Death."

And he said:

You would know the sec

And one of the elders of the city said, "Speak to us of Good and Evil."

And he answered:

Of

Love has no other desire but to fulfill itself
But if your love and must needs have desires,
Let

And the weaver said, "Speak to us of Clothes."

And he answered:

Your clothes conceal much of

And a merchant said, "Speak to us of Buying and Selling."

And he answered and said:

To you t

Give me the flute, and sing
immortality lies in a song
and even after we've perished
the flute co

In the stillest hour of the night, as I lay half asleep, my seven selves sat together and thus conve

And an orator said, "Speak to us of Freedom."

And he answered:

At the city gate and by your

And a poet said, 'Speak to us of Beauty.'

Where shall you seek beauty, and how shall you find he

And a woman who held a babe against her bosom said, 'Speak to us of Children.'

And he said:

Then an old man, a keeper of an inn, said, "Speak to us of Eating and Drinking."

And he said:

Then a lawyer said, "But what of our Laws, master?"

And he answered:

You delight in laying d

Leave me, my blamer,
For the sake of the love
Which unites your soul with
That of your beloved

Gone are my people, but I exist yet,
Lamenting them in my solitude...
Dead are my friends, and in

Then one of the judges of the city stood forth and said, "Speak to us of Crime and Punishment."

In the stillness of night Wisdom came and stood
By my bed. She gazed upon me like a tender mother

I would not exchange the sorrows of my heart
For the joys of the multitude.
And I would not have

Where are you, my beloved? Are you in that little
Paradise, watering the flowers who look upon you

And a youth said, "Speak to us of Friendship."

Your friend is your needs answered.

He is you

As the Sun withdrew his rays from the garden, and the moon threw cushioned beams upon the flowers, I

Part One


The power of charity sows deep in my heart, and I reap and gather the wheat in bundles

In the ancient days, when the first quiver of speech came to my lips, I ascended the holy mountain a

One heavy day I ran away from the grim face of society and the dizzying clamor of the city and direc

Love is a magic ray
emitted from the burning core
of the soul
and illuminating
the surroundi

Then said Almitra, 'Speak to us of Love.'
And he raised his head and looked upon the people, and t

Your pain is the breaking of the shell that encloses
your understanding.

Even as the stone of

Then said a rich man, "Speak to us of Giving."

And he answered:

You give but little when you

Then a woman said, "Speak to us of Joy and Sorrow."

And he answered:

Your joy is your sorrow

The dark wings of night enfolded the city upon which Nature had spread a pure white garment of snow;

Kahlil Gibran Poetry

Kahlil Gibran (/dʒɪˈbrɑːn/; sometimes spelled Khalil;[a] full Arabic name Gibran Khalil Gibran, Arabic: جبران خليل جبران‎‎ / ALA-LC: Jubrān Khalīl Jubrān or Jibrān Khalīl Jibrān) (January 6, 1883 – April 10, 1931) was a Lebanese-American artist, poet, and writer of the New York Pen League. Gibran was born in the town of Bsharri in the Mount Lebanon Mutasarrifate, Ottoman Empire (north of modern-day Lebanon), to Khalil Gibran and Kamila Gibran (Rahmeh). As a young man Gibran immigrated with his family to the United States, where he studied art and began his literary career, writing in both English and Arabic. In the Arab world, Gibran is regarded as a literary and political rebel. His romantic style was at the heart of a renaissance in modern Arabic literature, especially prose poetry, breaking away from the classical school. In Lebanon, he is still celebrated as a literary hero. He is chiefly known in the English-speaking world for his 1923 book The Prophet, an early example of inspirational fiction including a series of philosophical essays written in poetic English prose. The book sold well despite a cool critical reception, gaining popularity in the 1930s and again especially in the 1960s counterculture. Gibran is the third best-selling poet of all time, behind Shakespeare and Laozi.... Read More