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John Greenleaf Whittier Poetry

ohn Greenleaf Whittier (December 17, 1807 – September 7, 1892) was an American Quaker poet and advocate of the abolition of slavery in the United States. Frequently listed as one of the Fireside Poets, he was influenced by the Scottish poet Robert Burns. Whittier is remembered particularly for his... Read More

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I.
Sound over all waters, reach out from all lands,
The chorus of voices, the clasping of hands;

BENEATH thy skies, November!
Thy skies of cloud and rain,
Around our blazing camp-fires
We close

Here, while the loom of Winter weaves
The shroud of flowers and fountains,
I think of thee and sum

Oh, thicker, deeper, darker growing,
The solemn vista to the tomb
Must know henceforth another sha

My heart was heavy, for its trust had been
Abused, its kindness answered with foul wrong;
So, tu

To-day the plant by Williams set
Its summer bloom discloses;
The wilding sweethrier of his prayers

The firmament breaks up. In black eclipse
Light after light goes out. One evil star,
Luridly glari

Friend of my many years!
When the great silence falls, at last, on me,
Let me not leave, to pain a

Maud Muller on a summer's day
Raked the meadow sweet with hay.

Beneath her torn hat glowed the

SCARCE had the solemn Sabbath-bell
Ceased quivering in the steeple,
Scarce had the parson to his d

One morning of the first sad Fall,
Poor Adam and his bride
Sat in the shade of Eden's wall--
But

Talk not of sad November, when a day
Of warm, glad sunshine fills the sky of noon,
And a wind, bor

'TIS over, Moses! All is lost!
I hear the bells a-ringing;
Of Pharaoh and his Red Sea host
I hear

We saw the slow tides go and come,
The curving surf-lines lightly drawn,
The gray rocks touched wi

Take our hands, James Russell Lowell,
Our hearts are all thy own;
To-day we bid thee welcome
Not

Still sits the school-house by the road,
A ragged beggar sleeping;
Around it still the sumachs g

Blessings on thee, little man,
Barefoot boy, with cheek of tan!
With thy turned-up pantaloons,
An

poet John Greenleaf Whittier #111 on top 500 poets Poet's PagePoemsQuotesCommentsStatsE-BooksBiograp

To kneel before some saintly shrine,
To breathe the health of airs divine,
Or bathe where sacred r

MEN of the North-land! where's the manly spirit
Of the true-hearted and the unshackled gone?
Sons

Oh, dwarfed and wronged, and stained with ill,
Behold! thou art a woman still!
And, by that sacred

The circle is broken, one seat is forsaken,
One bud from the tree of our friendship is shaken;
One

UP, laggards of Freedom! — our free flag is cast
To the blaze of the sun and the wings of the bla

The river hemmed with leaning trees
Wound through its meadows green;
A low, blue line of mountains

How strange to greet, this frosty morn,
In graceful counterfeit of flower,
These children of the

Bland as the morning breath of June
The southwest breezes play;
And, through its haze, the winter

Up from the meadows rich with corn,
Clear in the cool September morn,

The clustered spires of Fr

The name the Gallic exile bore,
St. Malo! from thy ancient mart,
Became upon our Western shore
Gr

John Greenleaf Whittier Poetry

ohn Greenleaf Whittier (December 17, 1807 – September 7, 1892) was an American Quaker poet and advocate of the abolition of slavery in the United States. Frequently listed as one of the Fireside Poets, he was influenced by the Scottish poet Robert Burns. Whittier is remembered particularly for his anti-slavery writings as well as his book Snow-Bound. John Greenleaf Whittier was born to John and Abigail (Hussey) at their rural homestead in Haverhill, Massachusetts, on December 17, 1807. His middle name is thought to mean 'feuillevert' after his Huguenot forebears.[2] He grew up on the farm in a household with his parents, a brother and two sisters, a maternal aunt and paternal uncle, and a constant flow of visitors and hired hands for the farm. As a boy, it was discovered that Whittier was color-blind when he was unable to see a difference between ripe and unripe strawberries.[3] Their farm was not very profitable and there was only enough money to get by. Whittier himself was not cut out for hard farm labor and suffered from bad health and physical frailty his whole life. Although he received little formal education, he was an avid reader who studied his father's six books on Quakerism until their teachings became the foundation of his ideology. Whittier was heavily influenced by the doctrines of his religion, particularly its stress on humanitarianism, compassion, and social responsibility. Whittier was first introduced to poetry by a teacher. His sister sent his first poem, "The Exile's Departure", to the Newburyport Free Press without his permission and its editor, William Lloyd Garrison, published it on June 8, 1826.[4] Garrison as well as another local editor encouraged Whittier to attend the recently opened Haverhill Academy. To raise money to attend the school, Whittier became a shoemaker for a time, and a deal was made to pay part of his tuition with food from the family farm. Before his second term, he earned money to cover tuition by serving as a teacher in a one-room schoolhouse in what is now Merrimac, Massachusetts. He attended Haverhill Academy from 1827 to 1828 and completed a high school education in only two terms. Garrison gave Whittier the job of editor of the National Philanthropist, a Boston-based temperance weekly. Shortly after a change in management, Garrison reassigned him as editor of the weekly American Manufacturer in Boston. Whittier became an out-spoken critic of President Andrew Jackson, and by 1830 was editor of the prominent New England Weekly Review in Hartford, Connecticut, the most influential Whig journal in New England. In 1833 he published The Song of the Vermonters, 1779, which he had anonymously inserted in The New England Magazine. The poem was erroneously attributed to Ethan Allen for nearly sixty years.... Read More