Search Poetry Here

John Donne Poetry

John Donne (/ˈdʌn/ dun) (22 January 1573 – 31 March 1631) was an English poet and cleric in the Church of England. He is considered the pre-eminent representative of the metaphysical poets. His works are noted for their strong, sensual style and include sonnets, love poems, religious poems, L... Read More

Latest Urdu Poetry

Let me pour forth
My tears before thy face, whilst I stay here,
For thy face coins them, and thy s

I.

THE FATHER.

FATHER of Heaven, and Him, by whom
It, and us for it, and all else for us,

No man is an island,
Entire of itself,
Every man is a piece of the continent,
A part of the main.

STAY, O sweet and do not rise!
The light that shines comes from thine eyes;
The day breaks not:

Your mistress, that you follow whores, still taxeth
you ;
'Tis strange that she should thus confes

Thy sins and hairs may no man equal call ;
For, as thy sins increase, thy hairs do fall.
John Don

ALLOPHANES.
UNSEASONABLE man, statue of ice,
What could to countries solitude entice
Thee, in

Good we must love, and must hate ill,
For ill is ill, and good good still ;
But there are things

Salvation to all that will is nigh;
That All, which always is all everywhere,
Which cannot sin, an

ADOPTED in God's family and so
Our old coat lost, unto new arms I go.
The Cross—my seal at bap

Busy old fool, unruly Sun,
Why dost thou thus,
Through windows, and through curtains, call on
us?

In what torn ship soever I embark,
That ship shall be my emblem of thy Ark;
What sea soever swallo

Let me pour forth
My tears before thy face, whil'st I stay here,
For thy face coins them, and th

Out of a fired ship, which by no way
But drowning could be rescued from the flame,
Some men leap'd

Death be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadfull, for, thou art not soe,
For,

Twice or thrice had I loved thee,
Before I knew thy face or name;
So in a voice, so in a shapeless

Wilt thou forgive that sin where I begun,
Which was my sin, though it were done before?
Wilt thou

Some man unworthy to be possessor
Of old or new love, himself being false or weak,
Thought his pai

'Tis true, 'tis day; what though it be?
O wilt thou therefore rise from me?
Why should we rise, be

PERCHANCE he for whom this bell tolls may be so ill, as that he
knows not it tolls for him; and pe

Thou art not so black as my heart,
Nor half so brittle as her heart, thou art ;
What would'st th

Salute the last and everlasting day,
Joy at th' uprising of this Sun, and Son,
Ye whose true tea

Oh do not die, for I shall hate
All women so, when thou art gone,
That thee I shall not celebrate,

As virtuous men pass mildly away,
And whisper to their souls, to go,
Whilst some of their sad frie

Stand still, and I will read to thee
A lecture, love, in love's philosophy.
These three hours that

I am unable, yonder beggar cries,
To stand, or move; if he say true, he lies.
John Donne

If in his study he hath so much care
To hang all old strange things, let his wife beware.
John Do

By miracles exceeding power of man,
He faith in some, envy in some begat,
For, what weak spirits

Thy father all from thee, by his last will,
Gave to the poor ; thou hast good title still.
John D

When that rich soul which to her heaven is gone,
Whom all do celebrate, who know they have one
(Fo

[W.]

IF her disdain least change in you can move,
You do not love,
For when that hope gives fue

At the round earths imagin'd corners, blow
Your trumpets, Angells, and arise, arise
From death, yo

'Tis the year's midnight, and it is the day's,
Lucy's, who scarce seven hours herself unmasks;
The

Philo with twelve years' study hath been grieved
To be understood ; when will he be believed?
Joh

John Donne Poetry

John Donne (/ˈdʌn/ dun) (22 January 1573 – 31 March 1631) was an English poet and cleric in the Church of England. He is considered the pre-eminent representative of the metaphysical poets. His works are noted for their strong, sensual style and include sonnets, love poems, religious poems, Latin translations, epigrams, elegies, songs, satires and sermons. His poetry is noted for its vibrancy of language and inventiveness of metaphor, especially compared to that of his contemporaries. Donne's style is characterised by abrupt openings and various paradoxes, ironies and dislocations. These features, along with his frequent dramatic or everyday speech rhythms, his tense syntax and his tough eloquence, were both a reaction against the smoothness of conventional Elizabethan poetry and an adaptation into English of European baroque and mannerist techniques. His early career was marked by poetry that bore immense knowledge of English society and he met that knowledge with sharp criticism. Another important theme in Donne's poetry is the idea of true religion, something that he spent much time considering and about which he often theorized. He wrote secular poems as well as erotic and love poems. He is particularly famous for his mastery of metaphysical conceits. Despite his great education and poetic talents, Donne lived in poverty for several years, relying heavily on wealthy friends. He spent much of the money he inherited during and after his education on womanising, literature, pastimes, and travel. In 1601, Donne secretly married Anne More, with whom he had twelve children. In 1615, he became an Anglican priest, although he did not want to take Anglican orders. He did so because King James I persistently ordered it. In 1621, he was appointed the Dean of St Paul's Cathedral in London. He also served as a member of Parliament in 1601 and in 1614.... Read More