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Carl Sandburg Poetry

Carl Sandburg (January 6, 1878 – July 22, 1967) was an American poet, writer, and editor who won three Pulitzer Prizes: two for his poetry and one for his biography of Abraham Lincoln. During his lifetime, Sandburg was widely regarded as "a major figure in contemporary literature", especially for ... Read More

Latest Urdu Poetry

Your western heads here cast on money,
You are the two that fade away together,
Partners in the

Among the red guns,
In the hearts of soldiers
Running free blood
In the long, long campaign:
Dre

Hog Butcher for the World,
Tool Maker, Stacker of Wheat,
Player with Railroads and the Nation's

Among the bumble-bees in red-top hay, a freckled field of brown-eyed Susans dripping yellow leaves i

Jesus emptied the devils of one man into forty hogs and the hogs took the edge of a high rock and dr

Close-mouthed you sat five thousand years and never let out a whisper.
Processions came by, marche

Poland, France, Judea ran in her veins,
Singing to Paris for bread, singing to Gotham in a fizz at

A father sees his son nearing manhood.
What shall he tell that son?
'Life is hard; be steel; be a

Baby vamps, is it harder work than it used to be?
Are the new soda parlors worse than the old time

I wanted a man’s face looking into the jaws and throat of life
With something proud on his face,

Three walls around the town of Tela when I came.
They expected everything of those walls;
Nobody i

Now the stone house on the lake front is finished and the
workmen are beginning the fence.
The p

White moon comes in on a baby face.
The shafts across her bed are flimmering.

Out on the land Wh

They were calling certain styles of whiskers by the name of “lilacs.”
And another manner of bea

There will be a rusty gun on the wall, sweetheart,
The rifle grooves curling with flakes of rust.

I cried over beautiful things knowing no beautiful thing lasts.

The field of cornflower yellow i

Arithmetic is where numbers fly like pigeons in and out of your
head.
Arithmet ic tell you how

All day long in fog and wind,
The waves have flung their beating crests
Against the palisades of

You came from the Aztecs
With a copper on your fore-arms
Tawnier than a sunset
Saying good-by

The mouth of this man is a gaunt strong mouth.
The head of this man is a gaunt strong head.

The

And this will be all?
And the gates will never open again?
And the dust and the wind will play aro

The mare Alix breaks the world’s trotting record one day. I see her heels flash down the dust of a

Smash down the cities.
Knock the walls to pieces.
Break the factories and cathedrals, warehouses

A million young workmen straight and strong lay stiff on the grass and roads,
And the million are n

The fog comes
on little cat feet.

It sits looking
over harbor and city
on silent haunches
and

Many things I might have said today.
And I kept my mouth shut.
So many times I was asked
To co

Sobs En Route to a Penitentiary


Good-by now to the streets and the clash of wheels and
lockin

Cross the hands over the breast here--so.
Straighten the legs a little more--so.
And call for th

There is a blue star, Janet,
Fifteen years’ ride from us,
If we ride a hundred miles an hour.

And so to-day- they lay him away-
the boy nobody knows the name of-
the buck private- the unknow

Give me hunger,
O you gods that sit and give
The world its orders.
Give me hunger, pain and wa

Every year Emily Dickinson sent one friend
the first arbutus bud in her garden.

In a last will a

Carl Sandburg Poetry

Carl Sandburg (January 6, 1878 – July 22, 1967) was an American poet, writer, and editor who won three Pulitzer Prizes: two for his poetry and one for his biography of Abraham Lincoln. During his lifetime, Sandburg was widely regarded as "a major figure in contemporary literature", especially for volumes of his collected verse, including Chicago Poems (1916), Cornhuskers (1918), and Smoke and Steel (1920). He enjoyed "unrivaled appeal as a poet in his day, perhaps because the breadth of his experiences connected him with so many strands of American life", and at his death in 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson observed that "Carl Sandburg was more than the voice of America, more than the poet of its strength and genius. He was America.... Read More