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Barber, Mary Poetry

Mary Barber (c.1685 – c.1755), poet, was a member of Swift's circle.Mary's parents are not known. She married the amateur artist and draper, Rupert Barber (1719-1772) from Dublin, whose pastel portrait of Swift hangs in the National Portrait Gallery London. They had nine children, four of whom sur... Read More

Latest Urdu Poetry

Ye heedless Fair, who pass the live--long Day,
In Dress and Scandal, Gallantry and Play;
Who thro'

My Lord of Killala, I find to my Sorrow,
I can't have the Honour I hop'd for, Tomorrow.
But why I'

Remote from Strife, from urban Throngs, and Noise.
Here dwells my Soul amidst domestic Joys:
No ra

Go, Jealousy, Tormentress dire;
On Lovers only seize:
In Love, like Winds, you fan the Fire,
And

Not Persia's Monarch could, unmov'd, survey
Those num'rous Hosts, which Time must sweep away:
He w

Written when the Author was sick.
Somnus, pow'rful Deity,
Mortals owe their Bliss to thee.
How lo

Once Jupiter, from out the Skies,
Beheld a thousand Temples rise;
The Goddess Fortune all invok'd,

Ye heedless Fair, who trifle Life away,
Let either Brownlow set your Notions right:
Be, like the D

Dear Rose, as I lately was writing some Verse,
Which I next Day intended in School to rehearse,
My

Since Milo rallies sacred Writ,
To win the Title of a Wit;
'Tis pity but he shou'd obtain it,
Who

Ierne's now our royal Care:
We lately fix'd our Vice--roy there.
How near was she to be undone,
T

Why are we Scholars plagu'd to write,
On Days devoted to Delight?
In Honour of the King, I'd play

So little giv'n at Chapel Door!--
This People doubtless must be poor:
So much at Gaming thrown awa

How well these Laymen love to gibe,
And throw their Jests on Levi's Tribe!
Must One be toil'd to D

I beg your Scholar you'll excuse,
Who dares no more debase the Muse.
My Mother says, If e'er she h

'Tis Time to conclude; for I make it a Rule,
To leave off all Writing, when Con. comes from School.

Remote from Strife, from urban Throngs, and Noise.
Here dwells my Soul amidst domestic Joys:
No ra

A mother, who vast Pleasure finds
In modelling her Childrens Minds;
With whom, in exquisite Deligh

Contented in my humble State,
I look with Pity on the Great;
Who only Birth, or Wealth, respect,

Say, my Hortensia, in this silent Hour,
When the pale Queen of Night exerts her Pow'r,
What Guardi

All--bounteous Heav'n, Castalio cries,
With bended Knees, and lifted Eyes,
When shall I have the P

As in some wealthy, trading Town,
Where Riches raise to fure Renown,
The Man, with ample Sums in S

Dear Jack, whilst you thro' Flanders roam,
Can you forget your Friends at Home?
Say, will your Tut

When I heard you were landed, I flew to the Nine,
Intreating their Aid to invite you to dine.
They

Your late kind Gift let me restore;
For I must never wear it more.
My Mother cries, ``What's here

Children are snatch'd away sometimes,
To punish Parents for their Crimes.
Thy Mother's Merit was s

The Britons, in their Nature shy,
View Strangers with a distant Eye:
We think them partial and sev

This mourning Mother can with Ease explore
The Arts of Latium, and the Grecian Store:
Was early le

With Joy your Summons we obey,
And come to celebrate this Day.
Yet I, alas! despair to please;
Fo

Barber, Mary Poetry

Mary Barber (c.1685 – c.1755), poet, was a member of Swift's circle.Mary's parents are not known. She married the amateur artist and draper, Rupert Barber (1719-1772) from Dublin, whose pastel portrait of Swift hangs in the National Portrait Gallery London. They had nine children, four of whom survived to adulthood. She wrote, in the preface to her Poems, that she wrote mainly in order to educate her children, but most commentators agree that she had a larger audience in view and was considerably engaged with intervening in wider social and political issues, as she did with "The Widow's Address" when she argued on behalf of the widow of an army officer. She is an example of the eighteenth-century phenomenon of the "untutored poet, or 'natural genius'": an artist of unprepossessing background who achieved the patronage of literary or aristocratic notables.[1] Swift named her as part of his "triumfeminate," along with poet and scholar Constantia Grierson and literary critic Elizabeth Sican, and maintained that she was a preeminent poet — "the best Poetess of both Kingdoms"[2] — though this assessment was not universally shared and she has only recently garnered much critical attention. She moved into his circle and knew Laetitia Pilkington, who later became her harshest critic, Mary Delany, and poets Thomas Tickell, and Elizabeth Rowe. Swift's patronage was a substantial support to Barber's career and her Poems on several occasions (1734) was successful. The subscription list for the volume was almost "without precedent for its resplendent length and illustrious contents, and it was moreover remarkable given Barber's otherwise pedestrian social standing as an ailing Irish housewife." [3] There were over nine hundred subscribers including various aristocrats and a number of literary luminaries, notably Pope, Arbuthnot, Gay, Walpole, and of course Swift himself. She did not, however, achieve financial stability until at her request and in order to alleviate her financial distress, Swift gave her the English rights to his Complete Collection of Genteel and Ingenious Conversation (1738). Her health declined after the publication of her Poems and subsequent writing was sparse. She did publish some verses about the gout, from which she suffered for over two decades, in the Gentleman's Magazine in 1737. She died in or around 1755.... Read More